Video commentary:

Repressed emotional pain is a powerful force. Like a volcano, it seeks to rise up … coloring our perceptions, creating fear, impacting our relationships, robbing us of joy, and ultimately exploding into physical symptoms or emotional problems. In this video, Dr. Paul Hannig explores the benefits of therapeutic crying and actual feeling sessions. Learn how you can move on … healthier, happier and free from old emotional baggage.

I have been learning about the importance of expressing feelings, including sadness and anger in safe ways, such as crying or sharing about them. Like what Dr Hannig in the video “Deep Feeling Therapy” said, feelings show that we are alive, not dead, and in a sense, feelings are resurrection. It reminds me of what Jesus said to the religious teachers of his days, “We played the flute for you, and you did not dance; we mourned to you, and you did not lament.” It is as if Jesus wanted to point out how religion had suppressed people’s feelings and rob them of the freedom to express their feelings of happiness or sadness because the religious teachers had neither rejoiced with those who got healed on the sabbath days nor sympathised and wept with those who were down since they were too caught up with rules and regulations. I believe Jesus wanted to restore the sense of humanness to humanity.

After all, Ecclesiastes says there is a time and season for everything, a time to laugh and a time to cry. Both have their place, and both can be therapeutic in their own ways. Come to think of it, babies and young children instinctively cry and/or scream when they are sad or upset, and they get over it easily. It is as if we all started our human life knowing how to release our hurt feelings intuitively at an early age until we get older and learn that society as a whole frowns on such open display of feelings. I suppose crying is easier when done alone or in the company of close friends and family members or therapists. It is cathartic and brings much needed emotional healing and release, as noted by the video.

The act of punching on punchbags as shown in the video is also therapeutic, and I think sports and physical exercise also helps a person release emotional energy in a safe and healthy way. I read a book recently about the person Brian Boyle who recovered from the trauma of a near fatal accident, and three years later when he recovered well enough to take part in a triathlon, he recounted that when he was cycling long distance, memories flashed back in his mind about the ordeals he faced waking up from a coma and the struggles he went through in his long road to recovery and the people who supported and encouraged him, and tears streamed from his eyes even as he was cycling. By the time he reached the finishing point of the cycling route, he wrote that he felt as if he had just gone through a deep emotional cleansing.

There is a similar saying that says “Crying does not mean the person is weak, but the person has been trying to be strong for too long.”

“Any path is only a path, and there is no affront, to oneself or to others, in dropping it if that is what your heart tells you … Look at every path closely and deliberately. Try it as many times as you think necessary. Then ask yourself, and yourself alone, one question … Does this path have a heart? If it does, the path is good; if it doesn’t, it is of no use.”
~ Carlos Castaneda

I agree with Carlos Castaneda that it all boils down to whether the path we take has a heart, which I take it to mean whether there is love in it. Love is the only thing that remains eternal, and the echoes of kindness are endless. Any path with a heart of love and kindness is worth it, whether it is a difficult ascent to Mount Everest or a short trek in a forest, love is all that matters – love for ourselves and love for others, and a shared kinship of joy and suffering that unites our hearts with understanding and compassion.

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