Posted in Equality, Identity, Love

Human dignity and self-immolation

Quote by refugee

What caused a person to resort to such a drastic act of suicide in the form of self-immolation? I have read of similar cases in which Tibetan monks have taken their own lives by self-immolation, which also served as a form of protest against injustice and oppression by the ruling system. Similarly, the Arab Spring revolution that inspired Occupy Wall Street movement was sparked by a Tunisian man who set himself on fire in 2010 to protest against injustice, corruption and poverty.

Refugee Rights Action Network WA offered a sound explanation for such an act of self-immolation by an Iranian refugee, whose quote was shown above:

“On October 15 last year, Khodayar Amini, a Hazara man, set his body alight in a park in Dandenong, in fear of being redetained by immigration authorities. A patch of scorched earth marked his site of death, a silent testimony to an incredibly violent end.

Before Khodayar’s death, he stated clearly,
“My crime was that I was a refugee. They tortured me for 37 months and during all these times, they treated me in the most cruel and inhumane way, they violated my basic human right and took away my human dignity…They killed me as well as many of my friends such as: Nasim Najafi, Reza Rezayee and Ahmad Ali Jaffari”

For these men, the physical burning and scorching agony brought upon by fire, can be seen as a visible expression of the unacknowledged suffering that had plagued their lives under Australia’s merciless immigration regime.

As racialised bodies in a system designed to deny care to those deemed ‘unworthy’, these men have cried out to Australia, asking for care. In a system that renders their suffering invisible they have sought to make their suffering visible. With nothing else within their control, they have cried out with their bodies.”

I believe the underlying message is: Do I matter? As human beings, we all have an inner desire to be respected, acknowledged and treated with basic dignity. I am sure most, if not all, of us would have experienced in some form of discrimination or other, and the experience can be downright humiliating. In a recent incident on social media, I was chagrined when my post was removed twice by a group administrator without explanation, despite my request for an explanation, and I decided to raise an issue openly to challenge the perceived discrimination.

I can only imagine how much worse it has been for refugees whose voices have been drowned consistently by the uncaring system. It probably wouldn’t be fair for me to compare my own experience with those who had to deal with the systemic oppression day after day, which threatened their very survival and well-being. But I can certainly relate in some ways to their pains and suffering.

“Do I matter? Does my life matter?” is the question that continues unspoken in our lives whenever we undergo struggles and setbacks. In fact, the Black Lives Matter movement exemplifies the need to vocalise and highlight the issue of anti-black racism and institutional oppression of the black community that had resulted in white police brutality against unarmed black men and women.

May we all come to the realisation that we ourselves matter and so do others, and may we unite to subvert the inhumane system that threatens to strip us of our basic dignity and humanity.

Posted in Healing, Love, Psychology

Thoughts on how to clear dark entities

This comprehensive blog by Elizabeth Dahl Kingery reminds me of Nikola Tesla’s quote about thinking in terms of energy, frequency and vibration if we want to find the secrets of the Universe, for everything is energy which changes from one form to another. Given that the earth is about 4.6 billion (or 4,600 million) years old and the modern human species is relatively young, about 200 million years old, there must be a lot of energy that has been accumulated over millions of years circulating around the world, changing from one form to another, through the continual birth and death and evolution of plants, animals and human beings. As her blog said, there are benevolent and malevolent energies or entities we encounter in life, and each of us has our unique, individual ways of doing “our deep inner work of moving through (our) painful emotions and fears towards enlightenment”, whether it be deep relaxation, visualisation, meditation, certain crystals, herbs and high-frequency food and so on.

This cycle of existence, which suffering and pain is a part of, reminds me of the Buddhist concept of samsara – I googled and found this article by Teal Swan that has a similar view of accepting and embracing and working through our feelings and emotions in the process of doing our deep inner work. Recently, I decided to articulate in a blog on why and how I am learning to feel and express my feelings and emotions in order to more fully experience what it is to be human and to be alive.

And yes, we can trust and allow our intuition to guide us “because (our) higher self knows best what someone needs, and when they’re most open to receiving it.” I also have come to see that “self-love and self-empowerment are the most effective healing modalities for clearing entities” because the highest form of energy and the highest frequency is love, and our true self or identity is essentially and intrinsically love.

Posted in Philosophy

To be or not to be wise

The writer of Ecclesiastes wrote, “The wise man’s eyes are in his head, but the fool walks in darkness. And yet I know that one fate befalls them both. Then I said to myself, “As is the fate of the fool, it will also befall me. Why then have I been extremely wise?” So I said to myself, “This too is vanity.””

So, whether I am wise or whether I am foolish, I will still die one day. So the question naturally arises: If the same fate befalls both the wise and the foolish, and both will inevitably die one day, why be wise then? Why be foolish? It will all be in vain, won’t it? Or is it really in vain?

Maybe like Proverbs 9:12 says, if I am wise, let me be wise for myself, so as not to bear the folly of being foolish. So yes, I will still die one day, whether I be wise or foolish, but at least, I can tell myself that I have chosen to live well, or live wisely, or live consciously, as much as I can. What remains to be seen is: How do I go about doing that? That is my ongoing challenge and mission in life.

Posted in Love

Is love blind?

It has been said that love is blind. But I disagree. Love isn’t blind as love opens my eyes to see what truly matters in life. For example, I wouldn’t want to be friends with those who subscribe to the violent system that oppresses people in the name of power, control and competition. This runs contrary to love that is freeing or liberating, expansive and unconditional.