Posted in Uncategorized

Tennis inspirations

​I am inspired and moved to tears by how Venus Williams supports her younger sister to succeed. 

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-28/australian-open-serena-williams-beats-venus-in-final/8220242

http://elitedaily.com/sports/venus-williams-speech-losing-serena/1770859/
The above story of the Williams sisters and how they succeed together to become world champions in tennis is the reason I have been following their news whenever I get a chance because the love and support they have for each other and the dreams they hold on to in spite of challenges are mind-blowing and inspirational. For too long, competitive sports have been marred by rivalry and jealousy, but it is thanks to such gracious and big-hearted sportswomen and sportsmen such as the Williams sister, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal that makes tennis so refreshing and compelling to watch and follow. In the Australian Open women’s tennis final, Venus Williams could have chosen to seek her own glory but I believe she chose to let her little sister win and fulfil her dream of getting a world record of 23 Grand Slam titles in open competition era, and that speaks volumes of her graciousness and love. Like she said, Serena’s win has always been her win. Similarly, to my beloved: your success is my success, and your joy is my joy. I truly want you to flourish and prosper in the areas you find fulfilment to do so. 

Posted in Inspiration

Living consciously and choosing relationships over performance

I am getting a clearer vision of how important it is to value relationships over performance. For sure, sterling performance – whether it be making music or doing work etc – may impress people or reap material rewards at the workplace, but these are temporary and may not be always guaranteed, nor are they really necessary.

Relationships, on the other hand, are rewarding both materially and immaterially, and the benefits are lasting. When I choose to build relationships with people, lives will be blessed and transformed.

To be sure, there is a place to perform well, to maintain high standards and to meet schedules. But these goals are not the end goal in and of themselves; ultimately we do things well because we want to cultivate good relationships with others and we want their lives to be blessed and touched.

Furthermore, performance can be arbitrary because there is no one “correct” way of doing things – everyone has a different style, whether it be blogging, public speaking, editing, interacting with others, and so on. In fact, most, if not all, of us appreciate originality and authenticity, hence we can choose to shine and express ourselves through creative ways of doing things and enjoy the process and not worry about how well received our performance will be.

Last but not least, our identity and self-worth can never be defined by our performance. If we have an off day and do not perform up to par, it doesn’t mean our value has diminished. In comparison, regardless of our ability to do things, we can always cultivate good relationships by being kind and friendly.

 

Posted in Environmental awareness, Love

What if…

What if things are the way they are because they simply are…

What if we are all finding our way around and we aren’t really intentionally trying to hurt anyone or harm the environment, or if we do, it is because we don’t know what we are doing?

What if there is no conspiracy of the elite or illuminati controlling the world as they (if there is a “they”) are just as clueless as any one of us?

What if the environmental crisis is part of the evolutionary process in which we make choices based on what we know so far, not because fossil fuels are “bad” in and of themselves but because we only figured out how to use them in the beginning, and by the time we realised they caused serious pollution problems, some of us were too attached to the profits to let go of them and switch to cleaner energy alternatives?

What if there is no such thing as “good people” or “bad people” but only people existing on a continuum and making choices as we go along that make us look “good” or “bad” in the eyes of others at a particular point in time?

What if… ?

For even the most vile person ever known on Earth would have done something “good” in his or her life, and even the most saintly person ever existed on Earth would have done something “bad” in his or her life.

When we talk about “bad people”, the infamous names such as Adolf Hitler would come to mind. As atrocious as his crimes towards humanity are, I believe he would have at least done some kind deeds in his life when he was younger. Maybe he helped someone cross the street or said a kind word of encouragement to a friend or schoolmate when he was a young boy, which would have left a lasting impact on that person, and which in turn would send a ripple effect of peace and healing to the rest of the world. Of course, this doesn’t in any way justify the crimes that convicted murderers, rapists and so on have committed, but the point here is that no one is completely evil or born evil, and each of us – no matter how fallen we are at any point in time – would have at least done some good deed that has blessed humanity in some way or other, and each of us deserves a second chance if we want to right the wrongs we have done or at least make things better.

I believe we all have an inherent and intrinsic seed of goodness in us, which we can call our True Self, and I believe the reason we make unwise decisions from time to time that invariably cause harm to ourselves, to others and to the environment is usually because we lost sight of who we truly are – we have forgotten our true identity, and we don’t really know what we are doing and we don’t have the full knowledge of the consequences at that point in time. There is no condemnation – we can always return to the true Source and start all over again and learn from our mistakes and make amends for our failures wherever possible.

Posted in Equality, Gender issues, Racism

“It’s time for action” ~ Huffington Post

(In solidarity with fellow people of colour and white supporters of justice and equality)

What started off seemingly as a comedy appears to end up as a tragedy, for at the beginning of the US presidential campaign, no one really took the controversial businessman Donald Trump seriously as a likely candidate. The fact that he did end up as a president reveals the proverbial elephant in the room that is increasingly brought to the fore in this day and age of the Internet.

The uncomfortable truth that is often swept under the rugs in mainstream media is that America has always – always – been built on the violence and bloodshed of indigenous people, of black and brown people, of those who don’t fit into the agenda of the white supremacy, Eurocentric capitalism, colonialism and patriarchy, which is rife with racism, sexism, misogyny and other forms of systemic and institutional discrimination.

As this article “Don’t be surprised. This is the America you have always lived in” noted:

“This is hatred on a level that that we have not seen since Jim Crow… We underestimated as Americans how deep out hatred was of the ‘other,’ how deep white uneducated Americans felt about the demographic shift. We underestimated that level of insidious hatred.”

Barack Obama’s eight-year service as the president of the US may have brought some semblance of justice, sanity, equality and progressive change, but it fails to contain the underlying destructive mindset that remains embedded in the majority of the population. Mass shooting, mass incarceration of black and brown people, white police brutality against unarmed black and brown people and US invasion and involvement in the conflicts and wars especially in the Middle East and Africa and its interference in Asia-Pacific continue unabated, and are likely to stay the same or increase during the new president’s four-year term.

Perhaps what is more frightening than a racist and misogynist man becoming the president of the US is the fact that he has the backing of the majority who supported and voted for him, who make up the demographics of those Americans who are:
Uneducated
White
Rural
Christian
Conservative
(as noted by a white progressive Christian man living in America)

Posted in Peace, Psychology

HOW STAYING NEAR WATER CHANGES OUR BRAINS

It is interesting to learn from the article “How staying near water changes our brains” that “negative ions come primarily from natural energy sources, such as storms, rivers, and ocean tides”, which increase our capacity to absorb oxygen, help our body and mind to rejuvenate faster and promote healthy serotonin levels for mood regulation. I noticed that whenever I pass by a river or beach, no matter how small the water channel or water body is, I would instinctively turn my head to look at the water as I am naturally drawn to the calming, refreshing effect of the river or sea, merely by looking at the water.

Like the article says “Bodies of water, such as oceans and lakes, can help us to easily connect with our state of awe. This promotes mindfulness, reduces stress, and increases our physical well-being.” I can also relate to what it says about how “the rhythm of water can lull us into a deep and hypnotic state of relaxation” because I often find myself lapsing or being lulled into a state of relaxation and meditation when I pause by a river or sea.

Posted in Inspiration

Experiences, not things, bring lasting happiness

I noted from BigThink’s article “Want Happiness? Buy Experiences, Not Things, Says a Cornell Psychologist” that experiences are the glue of our social lives and are inherently social, hence they matter more to us than material objects. That is true as I can vouch for the fact that experiences, such as attending a music concert, leave a lasting imprint for beautiful memories in the heart.

I also noted that experiences reflect more of who we really are as they are closer to our inner selves as we are – the sum total of all our experiences. Yes, whether it be a hiking trip or a Nature retreat or yoga classes and so on, such experiences are worth immeasurably more than inanimate objects as the profound experiences enable us to connect deeply to our inner selves, to others and to Mother Nature around us.

Posted in Psychology

Exploring what it means to be conscious

I can meditate and experience a sense of being out of time and space for a while, but I need to remember that it doesn’t necessarily make me better or more enlightened than others. The danger is that I can become overly detached or even pompous and lose my humanity and ability to relate to others at a human level.

Yes, I am in the world and not of the world, but still I am in the world and need to reach out to help alleviate suffering and pain in the world as a fellow sentient being. By acknowledging my own suffering and pain and practising compassion towards myself, I can extend compassion towards others.

For instance, I can observe without being involved in an online discussion in a cycling forum, and I find myself making judgments about how people write and respond to one another and share their viewpoints which may come across to me as calm or argumentative or wise and so on. Then again, I have been there before myself, and I may have some blind spots that others can see when they read my posts in the forum. I need to realise and remember that I am both an observer and a participant of life. I can’t simply be an observer and not participate at all because it would be like living in a bubble.

It occurs to me that one paradox of life is that to be free from being bound by the worldly concerns of life, the way out is not to numb myself to not feel the feelings and emotions, but to allow myself to feel the feelings and emotions that a “normal” human being would feel. As much as I don’t like to be held hostage by circumstances and have my moods dictated by happenings that are beyond my control, and as much as I am learning to “respond” like a thermostat instead of “reacting” like a thermometer, I have to acknowledge the fact that I am not above Nature and I am also not beyond being a human being.

Animals, for example, seem to cooperate fully with Nature by being spontaneous with emotions in accordance with circumstances – whether they be joy, fear, sadness or some other feeling. They can be very intuitive in their own ways, sometimes not in the way we humans understand or are familiar with. Whether they are conscious of their own emotions or intuition is another story, as I don’t really know if they are conscious or capable of self-reflection and contemplation. But what I can do on my part as a human being is to practise flowing with Nature as well, and choose to be conscious of my emotions while living and being in this dynamic world.

 

Posted in Equality, Freedom, Uncategorized

What is freedom? Are meritocracy and citizenship necessary?

When I was a trainee undergoing Leadership Training Camp in Pulau Ubin in my first year of junior college, I looked at some of the seniors with wistfulness when they were rowing a wooden raft and enjoying themselves while we trainees were suffering from physical exhaustion. I longed to experience freedom like they do. Maybe when I become an adult, I will have that kind of freedom to do what I enjoy, or so I had thought. But years later, I still find myself grappling with the notion of freedom – for some reasons, I don’t feel completely free to be myself or to be fully at peace with myself and the world around me.

It has been said that “no one is free until (or unless) all are free.” Is that why I don’t really feel completely free? How to be really happy when I am aware that there are others out there still suffering from injustice or discrimination? Then again, will that day ever happen when all are free? Will I always have to postpone my happiness indefinitely? I know Thich Nhat Hanh encourages us to live in the present moment and be thankful for that moment. Maybe I have to give myself permission to be truly happy so that it sends peaceful, healing energetic vibrations to those who are still struggling.

I am coming to think that when Buddha attains enlightenment or Nirvana, it is not only for himself or herself. Maybe Buddha knows that by liberating ourselves first, we can liberate others. Maybe the concept of merit-based karma isn’t completely selfish – maybe we do good to ourselves and others not so much to accumulate good karma and better rebirth for ourselves but also to show others that a better way and a better world is possible, and we ourselves can make it happen. Maybe our motivation for helping others can come from the understanding that we are all interconnected, hence when we help others, we are helping ourselves, and when we help ourselves, we are also helping others because we are all one.

…..

Speaking of motivation, I am reticent to subscribe (wholly) to the national approach to “meritocracy” and “citizenship”.

Regarding meritocracy, do we necessarily get motivated to do things or to work hard in order to get rewards? Isn’t this an ableist approach to try to compete in a system that says “survival of the fittest”? Wouldn’t meritocracy result in people thinking they are more deserving than others because they are more able to do something? Wouldn’t it lead to elitism, classism, arrogance and snobbishness and cause us to look down on others who  have done less or achieved less than us, or to feel inferior if we think we don’t measure up to others who have done more or achieved more than us? I would also venture to say that meritocracy can lead to repression when we feel shamed or compelled to hide our inherent human weaknesses from the society or from public view in an attempt to look good, moral and “incorruptible”.

Regarding citizenship, I understand that this concept may arise from our fundamental need to belong to something or some group or tribe. I can understand and relate to the need for belonging as it may be hardwired in our genes the moment we are born to want to have a sense of belonging. However, as much as it is a valid need to belong to a community, do we need to have a formal citizenship in order to consider ourselves as belonging to a particular nation or country? Do we as human beings only have access to basic rights such as shelter or housing, healthcare and so on only when we are considered citizens of a nation? Wouldn’t a stateless person have the same human rights as a citizen in any land or country to have access to these rights?

In essence, if a government’s definition of citizenship is borrowed or adapted from imperialism, it implies that the indigenous people usually have less rights than those who are considered citizens who conform to the system, and their indigenous lifestyle and habitats are often being infringed upon or sacrificed whenever the government wants to clear their land and resettle them in the name of “development”, on the pretext of “doing what is good for the society”.

 

Posted in Love, Unity and harmony

There is no mountain

While pausing to attend to something important before setting out on the bicycle to run an errand, this realisation came to me:

The greatest mountain to overcome is the realisation and revelation of the elusive, esoteric truth that there is no mountain to overcome, no competition to be won, no race to prove who is better, faster, stronger or more powerful; indeed, there is nothing to prove.

It is all in the head (mind or mindset).

Only Love shall prevail. Only compassion shall preside. Only friendship shall win. Community and communion is our only hope.

Posted in Equality

Dealing with privilege

The Everyday Feminism article about the 160+ examples of male privilege in all areas of life is true and comprehensive. It really helps to be aware of these examples, because as the article put it, male privilege hurts everyone, including me because accessing male privilege often requires me to conform to a toxic norm of masculinity, which to me is simply another form of misogyny, and which marginalises men who don’t fit into that which the patriarchy-oriented system think men are “supposed” to be.

I find this related article to be helpful as well, as it recognises that having privilege can also mean a person can be privileged in some ways and experience oppression in other ways, which calls for intersectionality, and also I am reminded that having privilege means I can choose to step up to the responsibility to use the privilege for good, such as supporting the most vulnerable among us to strengthen our individual and collective struggles against any oppressive or discriminatory system or mindset.